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How to Use Cutlery

TIPS AND TRICKS

So many people dread eating methodologically with a fork, knife and spoon; just because they haven’t mastered the art yet or feel it is for a special group of people. A friend told me a story of how she was invited to a formal dinner date and was a little intimidated because she didn’t know how to use the cutlery set before her and everyone else knew how. In a bid not to embarrass herself, she turned down the food with the silly excuse that she had suffered a stomach sickness and was recovering. She ordered a glass of water instead and while others enjoyed the scrumptious meal that was served, she had to go through the torture of watching them eat the food. I didn’t judge her because I clearly understood her; I have been in that position before. Her story inspired me to write this article and I hope it helps you build your confidence on the table.

How to Hold Your Cutlery

  • A fork helps keep food in place while you cut out smaller bites with your knife. It is also used for lifting food from your plate into your mouth. When a fork is used with a knife or spoon, the fork should be held in the left hand with the prongs facing downwards. If it is used on its own, the fork is held in the right hand with the prongs facing upwards, resting on the fingers and secured with the thumb and index finger (the finger next to the thumb). Always hold your fork as near to the end as possible.
  • A knife is used to enable you cut your food easily and also used to pile food unto the fork. It should be held in your right hand, with the handle tucked into your palm.
  • A spoon is used to scoop liquid or semi-solid foods such as soups, ice cream, etc. It is held in the right hand, resting on the fingers and secured with the thumb and index finger. When using a spoon, always ensure you sip from the side of the spoon rather than the tip.

Important Tips to Note

  • When eating, bring the food or spoon to your mouth, rather than lowering your head towards the food.
  • When seated on a dining table, do not wave your cutlery in the air while talking; if you must gesture with your hands, lay your cutlery on your plate.
  • Don’t scrape or make noisy clattering sound with your cutlery against your bowl or plate. This is an extremely irritating sound and may annoy those around you. To avoid this, learn how to eat gently and slowly; take your time to enjoy your meal.
  • It is an extremely bad table manner to clang your cutlery against your teeth.
  • It is also considered bad manners to lick your cutlery once you are done eating.
  • Do not hold the spoon using your wrist.
  • If you accidentally drop a cutlery on the floor, leave it; the server will replace it for you.
  • If a 3 course meal is what will be served, start with the cutlery placed on the outer edge and walk your way inwards as the course changes.
  • When you are merely pausing and not done eating, indicate by placing your fork and knife in ‘twenty past eight’ position of the clock on your plate, with the prongs of the fork facing downwards. When you have finished eating, indicate by placing your cutlery in the ‘six thirty’ position of the clock on your plate, with the prongs of the fork facing upwards.

Eating with the right cutlery is actually very easy once you master the skill. The important key to mastering this skill is constant practice. To avoid getting embarrassed when invited to a formal dinner, try eating your meals with the right cutlery to develop confidence. “It is considered to be a civilized and good cultural act to adopt the use of spoons, forks and knives while eating.”

 

2 Comments

  • Anonymous
    July 9, 2017 at 01:08
    Reply

    <this helped me thank you

  • brian
    October 18, 2017 at 08:51
    Reply

    thanx

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